The integrated event for unconventional resource teams

Sponsoring Organizations:

Society of Petroleum Engineers American Association of Petroleum Geologists Society of Exploration Geophysicists

Endorsing Organizations:

Association for Iron and Steel Technology Association for Iron and Steel Technology American Rock Mechanics Association American Society of Mechanical Engineers American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Society of Petrophysicists and Well Log Analysts The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society Society of Petrophysicists and Well Log Analysts The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society

URTeC 2018 Special Sessions

University Lands Special Session I

Session Chairs: David Fulford and Meilin Du
  • Description
  • Details

Monday, 23 July

University Lands (UL) manages the surface and mineral interests of 2.1 million acres of land across nineteen counties in West Texas for the benefit of the Permanent University Fund (PUF). The PUF is one of the largest university endowments in the United States and benefits more than twenty educational and health institutions across both The University of Texas System and Texas A&M University System. This session covers technical work in reservoir, completions, and production engineering to evaluate the current unconventional development on University Lands and best practices recommended for unconventional wells in the Permian Basin.

  • Wolfcamp Geologic Reservoir Modeling Challenges: Brian J. Casey
  • Lessons Learned From Existing Horizontal Fractured Wells in Midland Basin of University Lands (UL): Rate Transient Analysis vs. Completion and Field Development Optimization: Jane Zhu, James K. Forrest, Hongjie Xiong, Yogashri U. Pradhan
  • Additional Applications of Optimal Artificial Lift Strategies in the Permian Basin: Yogashri U. Pradhan, Hongjie Xiong, James K. Forrest, Jane Zhu
  • Additional Applications on Determining Optimal Lateral Lengths and Trajectories on University Lands’ Midland and Delaware Basins: Yogashri U. Pradhan, Hongjie Xiong
Date Monday, 23 July
Time 10:30 a.m.—11:50 a.m.
Location George R. Brown Convention Center
Fee Included with registration

University Lands Special Session II

Session Chairs: Yogashri Pradhan and Jeff Spath
  • Description
  • Details

Monday, 23 July

University Lands (UL) manages the surface and mineral interests of 2.1 million acres of land across nineteen counties in West Texas for the benefit of the Permanent University Fund (PUF). The PUF is one of the largest university endowments in the United States and benefits more than twenty educational and health institutions across both The University of Texas System and Texas A&M University System. This session covers technical work in reservoir, completions, and production engineering to evaluate the current unconventional development on University Lands and best practices recommended for unconventional wells in the Permian Basin.

  • The Value of Regional Context: Brian J. Casey
  • The Effect of Initial Conditions and Fluid PVT Properties on Unconventional Oil and Gas Recoveries in the Wolfcamp Formation in the Midland Basin: James K. Forrest, Jane Zhu, Hongjie Xiong, Yogashri U. Pradhan
  • A Practical Way to Prepare Physical-Based Type Well Performance Curves for Unconventional Reservoirs in the Permian Basin: Hongjie Xiong
  • Evaluating Underperforming Wells on Permian Basin University Lands: Yogashri U. Pradhan, Jeff Spath, Hongjie Xiong, Jane Zhu, James K. Forrest
Date Monday, 23 July
Time 3:50 p.m.—5:35 p.m.
Location George R. Brown Convention Center
Fee Included with registration

Hydraulic Fracture Test Site (HFTS) Special Session I

Session Chairs: Kent Perry and James Courtier
  • Description
  • Details

Tuesday, 24 July

The HFTS is a field based hydraulic fracturing research experiment performed in the West Texas Permian (Midland) basin. The HFTS includes $25 million of hydraulic fracturing research that is “piggy backing” on 11 horizontal wells fractured with over 400 treatments in the upper and middle Wolfcamp formations.

As part of the HFTS experiment and in addition to the comprehensive filed data that was obtained; approximately 600 feet of core was obtained by drilling a one of a kind core well through the created hydraulic fractures at the test site. Phenomenal quality core was obtained. Based on observations of the acquired core the understanding of hydraulic fracture propagation, proppant placement and effectiveness is challenging current thinking. In situ reservoir pressure measurements during production, via permanent pressure modules, will aid in understating fracture connectivity and conductivity over time.

  • Hydraulic Fracture Test Site – Project Overview and Summary of Results: James Courtier, Jordan Ciezobka
  • Hydraulic Fractures in Core From Stimulated Reservoirs: Core Fracture Description of the HFTS Slant Core, Reagan County, Midland Basin, Texas: Julia F. Gale, Sara J. Elliott, Stephen E. Laubach
  • Assessment of In-situ Proppant Placement in SRV Using Through-Fracture Core Sampling at HFTS: Debotyam Maity, Jordan Ciezobka, Sarah Eisenlord
  • Analysis and Distribution of Proppant Recovered From Fracture Faces in the HFTS Slant Core Drilled Through a Stimulated Reservoir: Sara J. Elliott, Julia F. Gale
  • Natural and Hydraulic Fracture Density Prediction and Identification of Controllers: Joe Wicker, Whitney Campbell, James Courtier
  • Inter-well Communication Study of UWC and MWC Wells in the HFTS: Tanner Wood, Richard Leonard, Chad Senters, Chris Squires
  • Well Interference Diagnosis Through Integrated Analysis of Chemical Tracer and Pressure Interference Tests: Ashish Kumar, Puneet Seth, Kaustubh Shrivastava, Ripudaman Manchanda, Mukul Sharma
Date Tuesday, 24 July
Time 8:25 a.m.—12:15 p.m.
Location George R. Brown Convention Center
Fee Included with registration

Hydraulic Fracture Test Site (HFTS) Special Session II

Session Chairs: Kent Perry and James Courtier
  • Description
  • Details

Wednesday, 25 July

The HFTS is a field based hydraulic fracturing research experiment performed in the West Texas Permian (Midland) basin. The HFTS includes $25 million of hydraulic fracturing research that is “piggy backing” on 11 horizontal wells fractured with over 400 treatments in the upper and middle Wolfcamp formations. As part of the HFTS experiment and in addition to the comprehensive filed data that was obtained; approximately 600 feet of core was obtained by drilling a one of a kind core well through the created hydraulic fractures at the test site. Phenomenal quality core was obtained. Based on observations of the acquired core the understanding of hydraulic fracture propagation, proppant placement and effectiveness is challenging current thinking. In situ reservoir pressure measurements during production, via permanent pressure modules, will aid in understating fracture connectivity and conductivity over time.

  • Downhole Microseismic Mapping of More Than 400 Fracturing Stages on a Multiwell Pad at the Hydraulic Fracturing Test Site (HFTS): Discussion of Operational Challenges and Analytic Results: Neil A. Stegent, Cody Candler
  • Using Stage Level Microseismic Analysis to Correlate and Ground Truth Cored Hydraulic Fractures: James Courtier, Ryan Fairfield, Tammy Campbell, Shawn Lee
  • Using Stage Level Microseismic Analysis to Gain Insight Into Fracture Efficiency and Completion Effectiveness: Ryan Fairfield, Iris Wang, Danny Gray, James Courtier, Shawn Lee
  • Surface Seismic Monitoring of Hydraulic Fracturing Test Site (HFTS) in the Midland Basin, Texas: Abhash Kumar, Kevin Chao, Richard W. Hammack, William Harbert
  • Microseismicity Analysis for HFTS Pad and Correlation with Completion Parameters: Debotyam Maity
  • Environmental Monitoring of the Hydraulic Fracture Test Site (HFTS): Sarah Eisenlord, Tom Hayes
Date Wednesday, 25 July
Time 9:40 a.m.—12:15 p.m.
Location George R. Brown Convention Center
Fee Included with registration

American Rock Mechanics Association (ARMA): Principles, Simulation, and Practice

Session Chair: John McLennan
  • Description
  • Details

Wednesday, 25 July

ARMA is the American Rock Mechanics Association. Membership enfranchises specialization in all forms of surface and subsurface rock engineering - from tunneling to mine design to hydraulic fracturing to subsidence and compaction assessment. Membership is international, with members from 37 nations. This session provides new insights from four senior researchers and practitioners. The theme of the session is application of rock mechanics principles, measurements and simulations to characterize, comprehend, and exploit in-situ mechanical properties, discontinuities, stresses and treatment parameters. These premier practitioners offer perspectives from national laboratories, industry and academia.

  • The EGS Collab Project: A Field Stimulation Study in Crystalline Rock to Validate Models: Douglas Blankenship, Sandia National Laboratories; Timothy Kneafsey, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
  • Completion Engineer for a Day: How Geology and Geomechanics Can Influence Completion Designs in Unconventionals: Neal Nagel, OilField Geomechanics
  • Modeling of Hydraulic Fracture Height Growth Through Weak Interfaces: Xiaowei Weng, Pressure Pumping and Chemistry Product Group, Schlumberger
  • The Formation and Properties of Complex Fracture Networks in Shales: Mukul M. Sharma, Department of Petroleum, Geosystems and Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin
Date Wednesday, 25 July
Time 1:45 p.m.—3:30 p.m.
Location George R. Brown Convention Center
Fee Included with registration